What happens to students who leave your school?
How do you take children who have struggled in the public and separate school systems and make them successful?
How do you solve parent – teacher conflicts or student – teacher conflicts?
How long do students stay at TALC Academy?
Can students enter TALC Academy mid year?
Do you have a school open house for parents interested in TALC Academy?
Do you accept all students who apply?
Do your students get homework?
Do you provide references?
What do I do if I want to enroll my child at TALC Academy?


What happens to students who leave your school?

The majority of our students leave and return to the public or separate school system. They go on to public, separate or private high schools. For some students the TALC Academy Secondary School program is an option. We would encourage you to visit that section of our web site. Using the strategies that they have been taught and with a firm academic base, our graduates are very successful. We have been working with students in our school program for over ten years. We have seen our students go on to post secondary education at the college and university level. Our students have gone to McMaster, Western, Trent, York, Mohawk College, Sheridan College, Georgian College and other Colleges and Universities.

The following letter from a parent of a TALC Academy graduate perhaps best sums up what happens to our students.

As the new school year begins, I wanted to take a moment to touch base with you and say thank you. So many kids pass through all of your doors and I’m sure you wonder sometimes how they are doing, so I thought I’d let you know.

On Sunday, my husband and I took (our daughter – name redacted for privacy) off to the dorms at Monmouth University in southern New Jersey and got her settled in. Today, classes start and she begins her odyssey of post secondary education. She’s planning on dual majoring in history and secondary education, with some special education classes, thinking she might have a little insight into that area.

She actually took a history class for 3 weeks at William and Mary in Virgina the summer of 2009 and earned 4 college credits and an A, so while she never ended up with any AP (advanced college placement) credits a lot of her American friends have, she has this. She finished her high school career very successfully, earning two awards at the awards ceremony and a local scholarship at
graduation. I don’t have to tell any of you how rare those accomplishments are for LD kids – they’re currently in a pile and she’s insisted they be framed (she wanted to frame the checks too, but we convinced her to cash those). Her final grades were all As and a B (yes, even in math and English!), at an extremely competitive high school, where about 90% of the kids go on to University, one is
going to West Point and many are going to Ivy League schools.

I wanted to write and thank you for all that you do and have done over the years for all the LD kids who pass through your doors. I’m sure there are a lot of frustrating moments when you are looking at the day to day challenges you often face. I wanted you to know what a difference your work has meant in our lives.

Our daughter always had so much capability but it was locked so deeply inside of her. I thank all of you for what you contributed toward helping her unlock her potential and have a successful life.

All the best,
Karen

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How do you take children who have struggled in the public and separate school systems and make them successful?

Our primary focus is on the student and his or her needs. We design the program to meet the needs of the student. The curriculum is there to help the student learn. If the student is not learning then we need to change what we are doing. We individualize for each student. That just isn’t possible in the public and separate school systems. For many students in the public system, the reality is that the curriculum is the material that gets covered whether the student is benefiting or not. That is not the fault of the individual teachers – that is the reality of the system.

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How do you solve parent – teacher conflicts or student – teacher conflicts?

We put our students first in the learning situation. When a student is struggling we will do whatever is possible to help that student succeed. If that means that as a school we have to change our approach or change the materials that we are using – we will do so. We want parents to be in touch with us about difficulties that their children are having. Parents are our partners – not our adversaries.

Parents see a totally different side of their child than the classroom teacher does. We need to have input from parents in order to design the best program for students. If a student is not benefiting from the approach of a teacher, then that teacher will change the approach in order to better meet the needs of the student.

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How long do students stay at TALC Academy?

The simple answer is – that depends. Students who receive intervention early in their school career and who have specific difficulties can be with us for a short period of up to 2 or 3 years. For students who receive intervention at a later point in their school career, or who are several grade levels below the expected level, it will take a longer period of time to make the gains. However, students sign up on a yearly basis and the ultimate decision as to when a student leaves TALC Academy is up to the parents. We will give you our input and then support the decision that you make.

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Can students enter TALC Academy mid year?

Yes, although the majority of students start the year in September, we do have mid year entry. This is dependent upon space in the classroom.

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Do you have a school open house for parents interested in TALC Academy?

We do not have a public open house. We prefer to set up individual meetings with parents in order to explain about our program and discuss how the program can meet specific individual needs. Often parents are not comfortable discussing their child’s education needs in a public open house forum. Please call us to set up your individual appointment.

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Do you accept all students who apply?

No – we only take a student into TALC Academy if we believe that we can work with that student and make a difference. We take students who we believe we can work with and in return we expect our students to work hard in order to maximize their potential. We do not take students who have significant behavioral difficulties. There are other programs that are out there that are better
suited to meet the needs of these types of students. We do not take students who need one to one assistance in order to work safely in the classroom. Our classrooms have between 12 and 15 children and students need to be able to work in this type of environment. Our goal is to work intensively with our students in order to turn them into successful learners. With some students this is not a realistic goal and this type of student will be more successful in a different program.

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Do your students get homework?

There is nightly homework for all of our students. This is an important part of our program.

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Do you provide references?

We are more than happy to provide new parents with references.

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What do I do if I want to enroll my child at TALC Academy?

Please contact the school at 905 319 7011.

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TALC Academy
2054 Mountainside Drive
Burlington, Ontario
L7P 1A8
905 319 7011


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TALC Academy is a private school for children experiencing difficulty with their education and learning. Our goal is to work intensively with our students and provide individual intervention to address their specific needs, so that they will be able to return to the regular public or private school system as successful learners.

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